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3rd Engineer
3rd Engineer | Container Ship (Fully Cellular)

Container Ship

Container Ship (Fully Cellular)

3rd Engineer
3rd Engineer | Container Ship (Fully Cellular)

Engine

Container Ship

Container Ship (Fully Cellular)

Operational

3rd Engineer
3rd Engineer | Container Ship (Fully Cellular)

Container Ship

Container Ship (Fully Cellular)

Chief Engineer
Chief Engineer | Chemical/Oil Products Tanker IMO-3

Engine

Chemical/Oil Tanker

Chemical/Oil Products Tanker IMO-3

Management

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Why join BSM?

  • Be part of a multi-cultural working environment with high safety standards that focuses on sustainable ship operations and environmental protection.
  • Profit from many opportunities for growth by continuing to develop your professional career supported by our bespoke internal training programmes.
  • Benefit from BSM commitment to pay wages in full, correctly and on time.
  • Share your ideas - get involved, lead and inspire.

We’ll take good care of you at sea so you can look after your loved ones on shore.

Career pathways

At BSM, we look out for our seafarers every step of the way during their seafaring careers. Map out your journey in the maritime industry with BSM's comprehensive career development programmes. Our programmes are the BSM Cadet Programme, the Continuous Development Programme, the BSM Fleet Transition Programme and the Sea to Shore Programme.

Supporting a meaningful career at sea

BSM provides continuous onshore and onboard learning and development to support seafarers in their career progression.

Our five Maritime Training Centres, a designated team of onboard training superintendents and seafarer centric management system boosts the career development of our seagoing employees.

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Meet our seafarers

Captain Nestor Negrin Marquez

Captain Nestor Negrin Marquez was at sea for 40 years, before he decided to pursue a career on shore. BSM supported this transition and he now works as a Head of the Maritime Training Centre in Cyprus

Captain Nestor Negrin Marquez

Captain Nestor Negrin Marquez was at sea for 40 years, before he decided to pursue a career on shore. BSM supported this transition and he now works as a Head of the Maritime Training Centre in Cyprus

Seafaring is my vocation and passion. My career of over 40 years to date has been a long journey full of valuable experiences. After finishing my studies at the Naval Academy of the Cuban Navy, I was assigned onboard as a Messman, and was later promoted to Ordinary Seaman (OS), Able-bodied Seaman (AB), Store Man and Bosun.

Whilst I never had the opportunity to be a Deck Cadet, during my time as a rating I followed the same study plan as the cadet programme. I was therefore promoted to the position of Third Officer shortly after completing my studies, and over the years worked my way up the ranks to Second Officer and Chief Mate. The day I was promoted to Captain was the highlight of my career.

I sailed as Captain for 25 year during which time I joined BSM in 2014, specialising in containerships. When BSM offered me the chance to continue my career ashore I saw the opportunity to share my experience with our seafarers and to affect real change in the way they are trained.

Today I work as a Training Superintendent as a Head of the Maritime Training Centre in Cyprus.

I have always seen BSM as a progressive company that keeps abreast of changes in the market and makes seafarer safety and career prospects a top priority. I will continue to work with BSM and contribute to its focus on excellence in this areas.

To those who decide to spend their life at sea, my honest advice is this:

Aspiring seafarers: Be disciplined, learn the theory, and take every opportunity to combine theory with practice on board following BSM Cadet Programmes.

Officers/Ratings: Be disciplined, keep your workplace safe, report a deficiency immediately, don’t burn the steps between ranks and take the time to analyse your behaviour and your leadership skills. Always ask yourself if you are ready to be promoted.

Senior ranks on board: Contribute to the training of all seafarers on board, and share your experience to make them confident with your command.

Ada Njie

ETO cadet Ada Njie is on BSM’s Cadet training programme. When onboard a ship she is constantly learning and feels very supported by senior officers and fellow crew.

Ada Njie

ETO cadet Ada Njie is on BSM’s Cadet training programme. When onboard a ship she is constantly learning and feels very supported by senior officers and fellow crew.

My two-year career with BSM has so far been a pure learning process. In 2020 I joined my first ship as an Electro Technical Officer (ETO) Cadet and I am using my cadetship to develop the practical aspects of my field of expertise. Fortunately, my bosses have been very involved in my development as an Engineer and the rest of the crew are always ready to assist when I need support.

I’ve also had the opportunity to apply the theory I learned at university and to contribute to solving technical issues on board the vessel. Navigating the human element (cohabitating with other crew members) was a bit tricky in beginning, but now I am able to sail through relationships with other crew members . Life onboard is busy, and when not studying or working, I like to spend my time socialising with my fellow crew members, catching the sun on deck, or doing other activities I love.

Recently I received my license and I am now preparing to join ship once again as an ETO assistant.

A life at sea may be considered a unique choice to other people, but that’s one of the reasons why I chose it. When I joined [please give name of training institute] Maritime University, I noticed that that this career path is unique in The Gambia. In fact, I am proud to say that I am the first female from my country to work on oceangoing ships.

This career also brings challenges and I enjoy being encouraged to try things that may at first be scary and to push myself to try harder.

Further, the salary offered is better than I could expect in The Gambia, and I also get to visit different countries and interact with people from various nations.

To any aspiring seafarers, I would advise you to be authentic, to do the job well and adapt to new situations as they arise. I believe it is very important to stay true to yourself and to personally check in to make sure you are OK. Also, ask questions and speak up for yourself onboard, and don’t change just to please other people unless your behaviour is harmful to them. Always do the job to the best of your abilities and make sure you are progressing and developing both intellectually and skills wise.

Remember, people change, environments change, and situations change. Always be ready to adapt.

Oleg Nikolaychenko

Oleg Nikolaychenko decided to switch from sailing on containerships to LNG carriers midway through his career to expand his experience and knowledge

Oleg Nikolaychenko

Oleg Nikolaychenko decided to switch from sailing on containerships to LNG carriers midway through his career to expand his experience and knowledge

Seafaring is an opportunity to do a job I enjoy, that I am good, that helps others and pays well. When considering my career options as a young man, I was drawn to seafaring as it includes all of these factors. It’s also a great opportunity to travel.

My career began on Sail Training Ship Mir in 2007. Then in 2009 I joined BSM and my first container ship as a Deck Cadet. Since then I have worked onboard container ships of all sizes, rising through the ranks to Deck Assistant, Third Officer, Second Officer and Chief Officer on vessels across the world.

In recent years I realised that I wanted further my professional experiences, and so in 2021 I made the decision to join an LNG carrier as an Able-bodied Seaman (AB) in order to receive training and continue my career on this type of vessel.

Over the past year I have assisted the Chief Officer in all aspects of their job and since my promotion, continue to do the same as Third Officer. Senior Officers rely on my professional opinion and entrust me with important jobs, as they recognise and value the experience I gained on containerships. My career is developing.

In five years, I see myself as a Chief Officer onboard a full-size LNG Carrier and sailing as Master in 10 years. Eventually, I believe I would be a good candidate to join the office team as a Superintendent or Training Officer. Either way, I will continue on my pathway of professional development as an investment for the future.

I have experienced many good times and not so good times at sea, but a standout moment was when I became chief officer and how I felt the weight of the responsibility on my shoulders. It was difficult, but also wonderful, when people started coming to me with their questions and I had all the necessary knowledge and experience to help them.

There have been dark moments too, such as my first rescue operation when our Chief Engineer disappeared. We spent one day for searching for him and then passed this responsibility over to a professional search and rescue vessel. The Chief Officer was never seen again. It was in that moment that I understood that not all things are under our control.

To those considering a career at sea, I would advise you to learn English, read the manuals as soon as you have time, seek out jobs onboard by yourself for training purposes, be polite and proactive, be physically active and take care about your health, do not smoke and minimise drinking, communicate with people and respect their needs and limitations.

Ramasamy Selvam

Only eight years ago Ramasamy Selvam first joined ship as a Junior Officer, but has risen through the ranks and is now Chief Engineer

Ramasamy Selvam

Only eight years ago Ramasamy Selvam first joined ship as a Junior Officer, but has risen through the ranks and is now Chief Engineer

My career with BSM began in 2004 when I joined ship as a Junior Officer. My service to BSM has been recognised and rewarded, and I have risen through the ranks, learning skills on a variety of vessels and now sail as Chief Engineer.

The support from ship and shore staffs is great, and I am proud to that I have been a BSM employee throughout my entire career to date.

Seafaring has proved to be a good choice of career for me, as I like to work with different types of machinery and enjoy problem solving and decision making in critical situations.

And of course travelling to different countries and having the opportunity to understand the cultures of fellow crew is definitely an advantage of the job.

There have been many highlights during my career so far, not least the fact that I am recognised by BSM as a dedicated and reliable Marine Chief Engineer with a strong record of quality vessel safety maintenance. I’ve also had the chance to expand my skills and I developed a vessel drydock and repair specification and have attended drydock for couple of vessels.

Proficiency and hard work are the two basic qualities for a successful career at sea. Plan your career across various vessel types as much as possible during the early years in order to familiarise yourself with various machines and systems. Do not limit your expertise to one type of vessel where exposure to different systems will be limited.

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